Sophie Turner says she thought about suicide while filming Game of Thrones as a teenager 1 year ago

Sophie Turner says she thought about suicide while filming Game of Thrones as a teenager

"I would say, 'Yeah, I am spotty. I am fat. I am a bad actress.'"

Sophie Turner said she thought about suicide over negative comments from Game of Thrones fans about her appearance and acting ability.

The actor, who plays Sansa Stark in the HBO show, said that she spent a lot of her teenager years believing what was said about her online.

Speaking to Dr Phil on his podcast, Phil in the Blanks, Turner said she didn't feel like she was very depressed at the time, but that she found herself thinking about suicide a lot.

"It's weird," she said. "I say I wasn't very depressed when I was younger, but I used to think about suicide a lot when I was younger. I don't know why though.

"I had no motivation to do anything or go out. Even with my best friends, I wouldn't want to see them (...) I would cry and cry and cry."

Turner said that she and fellow GoT actor Maisie Williams, who plays Arya Stark, withdrew a lot and used to stay inside together.

She said that although they had each other, she thinks their relationship was "destructive" because they were relying far too heavily on one another.

"We would get home from set, go to a Tesco, a little supermarket, across the road and just buy food," she said. "We'd go back to our room and eat it in bed. We never socialised for a couple of years."

"I would say, 'Yeah, I am spotty. I am fat. I am a bad actress'.

"I would just believe it. I would get them to tighten my corset a lot. I just got very, very self-conscious."

Turner said that she has since taken a break from work to focus on her mental health.

She said that she learned to love herself through realising that other people do already, and cites her relationship with Joe Jonas as a turning point in feeling better about herself.

"So many people are kind of plagued with depression or anxiety or body issues," she said. "More people than people realise.

"If people just opened up to their friends and family, it would be OK. All you have to do is to speak to someone, and you can get the help that you need.