The Irwin family has helped over 90,000 animals during Australian bush fires 2 months ago

The Irwin family has helped over 90,000 animals during Australian bush fires

Incredible.

Over the last few days Australia has been ravaged by bush fires that have killed millions of animals and taken the lives of several people.

The loss of so many animals alone could have devastating effects for the Australian eco-system, even after the land recovers from the fires.

Not surprisingly the Irwin family jumped in straight away to help as many animals as possible and have managed to protect well over 90,000 animals from the bush fires.

Following in her late father Steve's footsteps, Bindi Irwin recently posted to her Instagram describing her heartbreak at the current situation in Australia and how her family plan to help;

"With so many devastating fires within Australia, my heart breaks for the people and wildlife who have lost so much. I wanted to let you know that we are SAFE.

There are no fires near us @AustraliaZoo or our conservation properties. Our Wildlife Hospital is busier than ever though, having officially treated over 90,000 patients.

My parents dedicated our Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital to my beautiful grandmother. We will continue to honour her by being Wildlife Warriors and saving as many lives as we can."

Naturally there were a lot of messages of support from fans of Bindi and the rest of the Irwin family who have dedicated their lives to protecting wildlife;

"I can’t imagine how proud your dad would be of you and your wonderful family."

"Thank you so very much Bindi, for dedicating your entire life to helping our beautiful wildlife and conservation! It breaks my heart to see what is happening around Australia right now.

Thank you to all the amazing wildlife warriors at the Australia Zoo wildlife hospital continuously dedicating their time to helping all the beautiful animals in need. Thank you for being a voice for those who can't speak and spreading this very important message!"

Since losing her wildlife expert father Steve in 2006, Bindi, her brother Robert and mother Terri have continued his work.