Couples who post more selfies are less happy, says study 2 weeks ago

Couples who post more selfies are less happy, says study

As it turns out, couples who refrain from over-sharing can be up to 128% happier.

A recent study has found, perhaps unsurprisingly, that couples who share selfies of themselves together on social media tend to be unhappier than couples who refrain from posting.

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The research, which was carried out by Shotkit, surveyed 2,000 couples between the ages of 18 and 50 to gauge both their happiness as well as their social media habits.

Additionally, couples were quizzed on their communication skills, trust and intimacy.

The study found that couples who share three or more couple selfies a week are 128% unhappier than those who keep their relationships more private.

52% of couples surveyed share relationship pictures three times a week, 24% share occasional pictures and 8% of respondents do not post about their relationship online.

Their main reasons for refraining include privacy, embarrassment and the fact that they're not regular social media users.

One of the study's findings suggest that just 10% of couples who share regular updates of their relationship consider themselves to be "very happy".

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Meanwhile, 46% of couples who rarely post selfies rank highly in terms of happiness.

In terms of generational differences, older millennials post much more regularly than their Gen-Z counterparts.

Speaking on the study's findings, Shotkit's Martin Stevens said:

"There are often mixed views on whether posting on social media regularly has positive effects on us and our relationships. We expected there to be some disparities with the survey, but we didn't know quite how much of a difference it could make, 128% happier is a huge amount!"

He continued: "However, this isn't to say that all social media sharing is bad, of course not. Perhaps the saying 'too much of a good thing' is true in this case. We hope that the research provided some insight, and perhaps food for thought for some people."

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