This Match.com ad has just been banned after it was deemed "sexist" and "offensive" 3 months ago

This Match.com ad has just been banned after it was deemed "sexist" and "offensive"

They have apologised.

A new and controversial Match.com ad has been banned Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) after it was inundated with complaints.

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After viewers slammed the online dating site with complaints that the ad promoted negative gender stereotypes, showing scenes of a boyfriend saying his favourite features in his girlfriend are that she "makes me a protein shake" and "lays out my socks".

Calling her a "keeper" because of these, the ad was shared on TikTok showing the girlfriend bringing a drink to her boyfriend and switching TV channels for him while he stands by to watch.

The ad says: "I will make him his protein shake after the gym. I always make sure he has a fresh towel and socks for after his shower. I put the football on for him every evening."

The ad received a lot of criticism, with one person writing: "Welcome back to 1882. @Match @match_UK kindly explain why you've made this tiktok? The things that make HIM realise she's a keeper? She makes him drinks, puts out his towel and clothes while showering, and puts football on every night for him. All in skimpy outfits."

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Following on from this, the ASA said that the woman doing these things to "please her male partner" may have been interpreted into these negative stereotypes.

They commented: "We further noted that the actions of the woman were one-sided and were not reciprocated by the man in the ad."

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Also mentioning the title of the ad, "things that make him realise I'm a keeper", they claimed it "reinforced the idea that women should be subservient to men in order to maintain a successful relationship."

"We concluded that the ad perpetuated negative gender stereotypes and was likely to cause harm and widespread offence," the ASA said.

Declaring the ban, it added: “We told Match.com to ensure that they did not portray sexist or negative gender stereotypes in future marketing communications.”

Responding to the comments, Match.com said that it was part of a three part series, one showing the man doing similar gestures for his girlfriend but admitted that there could have been a more appropriate way to go about it.

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