PETA is calling for a boycott of I'm a Celeb for its "cruel" use of animals 2 months ago

PETA is calling for a boycott of I'm a Celeb for its "cruel" use of animals

Would you watch the show without live animals?

Animal rights advocacy group PETA is calling for a boycott of this year's I'm A Celeb due to its continued use of live animals during challenges.

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The pressure group has especially pointed to the iconic Bushtucker trials, which very often include live animals like snakes, rats, and spiders.

"Every season of this show brings more cruelty to our screens," Peta UK's Media and Communications Manager, Jennifer White, told Metro.

She continued: "Animals are terrified and abused and killed for these challenges and it's all for a cheap laugh.

"We encourage everyone to boycott watching this year's show."

White added: "People didn't want to see animals being eaten alive, and they got rid of live eating challenges, but we're still seeing animals being treated in these incredibly horrific ways, all to try and up their TV ratings."

PETA claims that there have been hundreds of complaints to Ofcom, while White cites one situation as particularly harmful.

During the 2009 series, Gino D'Acampo and Stuart Manning were sent into exile and were particularly frustrated at the amount of protein included in their meal.

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D'Acampo, most known as a chef, then stabbed and cooked a live rat that was scurrying around the camp.

White continued: "If we were seeing dogs and cats being eaten alive and trampled on by the celebrities there would be absolute uproar and we would have seen a ban already."

She claimed that most people watch the show for the drama and antics and not for the inclusion of live animals.

"It's really turning people off the programme, and people understand that this show gives off an irresponsible message."

A spokesperson for I'm A Celebrity previously told Metro: "I'm A Celebrity complies with animal welfare law concerning the use of animals and we are proud of our exemplary production practices."

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