These are the most expensive and least expensive Eircode areas in Ireland 4 years ago

These are the most expensive and least expensive Eircode areas in Ireland

Does your Eircode fall into either category?

To the surprise of absolutely nobody, Dublin is home to the ten most expensive Eircode areas for household dwelling purchases, according to figures released by the Central Statistics Office (CSO) on Wednesday.

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In the year to February, Dublin 6 proved to be the most expensive Eircode area in the entire country, with an average price of a cool €724,711. Better get saving if you’re planning on buying a house there anytime soon.

Dublin 4, with an average price of €711,919, was the second most expensive Eircode, followed by A94 Blackrock, where houses had an average price of €648,347.

The least expensive Eircode area within Dublin was Dublin 10, meanwhile, with an average price of €169,348.

Two of the most expensive Eircode areas outside of Dublin, according to the CSO figures, are in Wicklow, with house prices in Greystones and Bray coming in at an average of €402,939 and €364,065 respectively.

In third place for most expensive Eircode area outside of Dublin was P17 Kinsale in Cork, which had an average price of €357,447.

At the other end of the scale, the least expensive Eircode area over the last 12 months was F45 Castlerea in Roscommon, with an average price of €69,808, followed by H23 Clones (€78,152) and F35 Ballyhaunis (€84,727).

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As far as median house prices are concerned, meanwhile (exactly half of homes listed are above the median price and exactly half are below) the three most expensive Eircode areas were A94 Blackrock (€575,000), A96 Glenageary (€522,000) and Dublin 6W (€510,000).

The three least expensive Eircode areas for median house prices, meanwhile, were H23 Clones (€50,000), F45 Castlerea (€56,500) and F35 Ballyhaunis (€62,250).

Images via cso.ie

Overall, CSO figures showed that, in the year to February, residential property prices at national level increased by 10.7%. In Dublin, residential property prices increased by 8.3%, but the increase was more noticeable outside of the capital, with house prices increasing by 13.1% over the same period.

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The greatest price growth was evident in the west (19.8%), while the mid-east showed the least price growth, with house prices increasing 9.3%.

You can check the average and median prices of houses by Eircode here.