We spoke to the Irish baby chicks who paint celebrities and they're a talented bunch 2 years ago

We spoke to the Irish baby chicks who paint celebrities and they're a talented bunch

If there's a better way to celebrate the Easter weekend than checking out some art that five baby chicks painted than we've yet to come across it.

This isn't any ordinary art though... and these aren't ordinary chicks.

This is art featuring an array of celebrities but portrayed as yellow chickens themselves - beaks and all.

And the chicks came from the top of Kildare man Paul Broughall's fridge when he discovered them there one day.

Not a bad way to start off an artistic internet sensation, in fairness.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BgjAOd4heKo/?hl=en&taken-by=artisticchicks

The chicks have painted everyone from Kim Kardashian to Jimmy Kimmel to even the actual Mona Lisa.

And their work hasn't gone unnoticed either, with the the likes Sarah Jessica Parker, Stephen Fry, and Courtney Cox all applauding their chicken-based creations.

Luckily, they haven't let the fame go to their heads though.

The chicks, or rather, Paul, told Her that the five guys are still fairly humble despite all the success. "They demand the odd more expensive chick feed," he says, "but that's about it."

Paul's chicks started painting celebrities about five years ago.

The 29-year-old says he doesn't have a favourite piece of work, but that ones that get actual recognition from their subjects tend to be pretty special.

"Whenever a new painting is finished I'm really pleased with it," he says. "It's always a new favourite."

"But celebrity feedback always makes a painting more special. It's like a virtually signed book or t-shirt."

Since beginning their careers, the chicks have amassed a fair amount of followers on social media, and while they're undoubtedly going to be painting away through the weekend, they're currently focused on bringing their career to new heights.

"The ultimate goal is for Ellen (DeGeneres) to notice them," says Paul. "But I'd love for them to get more attention in Ireland too."