Two sisters abandoned in hospital as babies reunited 32 years later 1 month ago

Two sisters abandoned in hospital as babies reunited 32 years later

"I feel like if you had to leave a child after giving birth, it must’ve been difficult."

Two sisters have been reunited 30 years after being abandoned by their mum in a hospital's toilets, 18 months apart.

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Natasha and Lee-Ann accidentally found each other through Davina McCall's show Long Lost Family. The team were originally trying to help Lee-Ann find her birth mum, but things ended up taking a different route instead.

The pair appeared on This Morning on Monday to share their incredible story.

"I was found in the cubicle of the toilets in St. Thomas Hospital, I was adopted at two years old and I turned maybe 19 and I started the search to look for my family," Natasha explained.

"A couple of years ago, I started the search with Long Lost Family and it’s just been a long journey to find anything. Last year, we met!"

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A year and a half before abandoning Natasha, their mum had done the same to Lee-Ann.

"18 months prior to it happening to Natasha, I was left at a hospital in south London – it doesn’t exist anymore – but in very similar circumstances," Lee-Ann said.

"So, in the staff toilets of that hospital , I was left to be found and was found by a paramedic… I was left a couple of days old, so a few days younger than Natasha was. Then I was in foster care for a few months and then adopted by my parents."

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Natasha has revisited the cubicle she was left in as a baby, and said the experience was overwhelming.

"I didn’t know what to expect. I went in, and it just felt like everything happened, the emotion came out, the tears came out.

"I’ve got this image in my head of what it would’ve been like, playing it through my mind. Then standing in front of the cubicle and seeing it, it was just overwhelming."

However, the sisters are clear that, despite their disturbing past, they have no hatred towards their mother.

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"I feel like if you had to leave a child after giving birth, it must’ve been difficult,’ Natasha added.

"The fact that she made sure we were left in the right place, we were both left in blankets, you can tell she did the most she could," Natasha said.

Lee-Ann added: "I think she did what she needed to do and I think there was great care in how she arranged to leave us in very, very safe places."